Renewal notices sent without domains names by registry.

There have been several notices sent during the last 24 hours concerning 5 day renewal warnings that did not contain the domain name of concern and were left blank.

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FINAL NOTICE! The domain(s) listed below are expiring in 5 days.

If you wish to renew this domain, please log into
your easyDNS members section immediately to remit payment for the renewal invoice.

If your domain is not renewed within 5 days, it will be de-activated and service for your domain will cease. At that point, you will have 40 days to renew the domain (at which point it will be re-activated). If it is not renewed within the 40 days, the domain(s) will no longer belong to you and will become eligible to be re-registered by another party.

If you have any questions, please email support@easydns.com.

Domain Name, Expiry Date

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This has been caused by a registry error and we have been assured that the notices will be sent again very soon
and they will contain the domain name proper as was originally intended.

we do apologise for any inconvenience.

thank you
easyDNS

New phishing scam

A new phishing scam has hit the circuit requesting that domain holders login to correct errors in their whois records.

as example.

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Dear user,

On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 10:42:40 -0500 we received a third party complaint of invalid domain contact information in the Whois database for this domain Whenever we receive a complaint, we are required by ICANN regulations to initiate an investigation as to whether the contact data displaying in the Whois database is valid data or not. If we find that there is invalid or missing data, we contact both the registrant and the account holder and inform them to update the information.

The contact information for the domain which displayed in the Whois database was indeed invalid. On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 10:42:40 -0500 we sent a notice to you at the admin/tech contact email address and the account email address informing you of invalid data in breach of the domain registration agreement and advising you to update the information or risk cancellation of the domain. The contact information was not updated within the specified period of time and we canceled the domain. The domain has subsequently been purchased by another party. You will need to contact them for any further inquiries regarding the domain.

PLEASE VERIFY YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION – http://www.yourregistrar.com

If you find any invalid contact information for this domain, please respond to this email with evidence of the specific contact information you have found to be invalid on the Whois record for the domain name. Examples would be a bounced email or returned postal mail. If you have a bounced email, please attach or forward with your reply or in the case of returned postal mail, scan the returned letter and attach to your email reply or please send it to:

Attn: Domain Services 14455 N Hayden Rd Suite 219 Scottsdale, AZ 85260

LINK TO CHANGE INFORMATION – http://www.yourregistrar.com

Thank you,
Domain Services

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the link http://www.yourregistrar.com will send you to one of several fake registrars login interfaces and ask you to input your user ID and password.

Please be aware of any email you receive that look similar to the above message in any way and bring them to the attention of your ISP and report them as phishing scams.

thank you
easyDNS

How to explain "URLs" so anybody can understand them

One of our tech support guys just had a conversation with somebody who wanted “to register the URL http://example.com/something.html”, where example.com was already registered, the person couldn’t understand why he couldn’t have that URL with “something.html” after it.

We’ve heard variations of this one a lot. Like somebody who knows “xyz.zz” is taken “but can I register “www.xyz.zz?”, no, you can’t.

The easiest way to explain a URL such as this one:

http://www.example.com/something.html

Is to think of it as HOW, then WHERE and finally WHAT:

http:// — how? The method we are going to use to retrieve or “get to” the document described by the URL. Common ones are “http” (Hyper-Text Transfer Protocol), you may also see “ftp://” or “mailto:”
www.example.com — where? This is the hostname of the server, somewhere on the internet, which is holding the document we actually want
/something.html — what? Finally, after we know what server we are looking for and how we’re going to retrieve the document from it, we now specify exactly which document we want off of the remote server.

Understand those three components and you basically have URLs down cold.

Your web browser (firefox, safari, IE, Opera) is all about “how”, what protocols to use to pull all these documents over the web to your desktop.

The web host is the “what” machine. It sits on a server and serves document after document to remote web browsers who send it requests.

Something has to bridge the browser to the web host/server and that’s the “where”, that’s where DNS and domains come in, and that’s primarily what we do here at easyDNS. We tell web browsers (and other client applications) the “where” aspect of retrieving and transmitting documents (the “whats”) across the internet. We do this via “DNS lookups” …about a quarter billion times a day.

Yahoo email forwarding service restored…

The issue we were experiencing with a delay in relaying email to Yahoo email addresses has been resolved, and email should be relayed without issue. We apologise for the inconvenience.

If you continue to experience an issue with email forwarding to your Yahoo email address, please contact Support (1-888-677-4741).

Email Forwarding To Yahoo Addresses Delayed

We are currently investigating an issue with Yahoo throttling email being forwarded from us.

Any email that is not being accepted by Yahoo at this time will be queued on our mailservers until delivery is successful.

This will result in a longer than usual relay time.

We are endeavouring to resolve this issue, and apologize for any inconvenience.